ShaggyAndLambOur first lamb of the season was born today. By guess who? Shaggy Carpet sheep. So, the mystery of her due date is over. This lamb came a bit early, on day 143 of her gestation (I’m assuming she was bred on the first day with the ram). Different sources cite different gestation ranges for sheep, I’ve seen all the way from 140-159 days. But I think most sources say figure on 148 days, with 4 days leeway in either direction. So I was thinkin’ that tomorrow, day 144, would be the earliest we might see lambs from the ewes bred on the first day. Ya just never know!

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I haven’t written about the Dolly Llama much lately, so this is for Angie (and probably Marla and Tiffany too!). Here she is!

llamahead

She is doing much better these days, compared to the er, flood incident that happened in January of 2009.

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imageYesterday when Bronte got in with the sheep, I made a mental note to  turn the hotwire back on. You see, I’ve had it off for a month or so, to relieve myself of the hassle of keeping the battery charged during the winter months when the solar charger isn’t very effective. It was working fine having it off. The sheep had no reason or desire to get out and mingle with Bronte in the dead grass field, and Bronte has been pretty religiously wary of the hotwire. She is very pain-sensitive for such a gigantic dog.

I forgot to turn the hotwire back on yesterday though. And this morning when I went to feed the sheep, though Bronte was on the “legal” side of the fence, I could tell she’d been in with the sheep earlier.

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LlamaEating

The llama is getting a little tamer these days. I think having lived here for about a year now, she’s adjusted more and gotten used to me, all the dogs, and the layout of the place. She is much less flighty.

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DormantRCG

My last bit of learning from Woody Lane’s class on grass actually happened at the lunch table. I had the good fortune of sitting by him, so got another whole hour of his knowledge! The topic of discussion was of great interest to me: reed canary grass (RCG), because we have a lot of it. The above picture is what our RCG looked like when we first started to tackle it, during the winter, it would lay in dead layers of brown like this. Beyond it, you can see a field of more “normal” green pasture grass that had been well-maintained by the prior property owner, cut for cow silage multiple times per season.

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